What is Lard?

Lard

Lard has long been used in pastry because it produces light, flaky pastries like pies. It can also be used as a cooking and frying fat for various purposes. In a process known as larding, lard is inserted into or wrapped around meats to baste them while they cook. High-quality varieties are flavorful but not overpowering, and they can be used in place of butter in recipes. Use about one-fifth less than the recipe calls for when using them as a butter substitute.

There are several grades to choose from.

Lard Nutrition Facts

Lard

Lard is a versatile cooking fat perfect for roasting, baking, and sautéing. It is also an excellent choice for keto and homesteader recipes, and it can also be used for traditional biscuits and marinades. In addition to its use in cooking, Lard is also a great addition to traditional lard soap. The best organic Lard for cooking is available from a few sources, and several online sources sell Lard that is free of chemicals and preservatives.

Lard Nutrition Facts

Make sensible meal selections to avoid excess calories. Calorie requirements differ depending on age, gender, and way of life.

The Best Organic Lard For Cooking

lard

While lard has long been a part of traditional cooking, a recent revival has made it much more popular. Homesteaders have made soap using lard, and a new generation of chefs is exploring ways to use this versatile fat. You can bake and fry with lard for various dishes, such as confit, fried chicken, and traditional biscuits. You can also use lard for homesteader soap-making.

Lard Nutrition Facts

Lard is an excellent choice for baking, sautéing, and frying, and it is perfect for KETO and homesteader cooking.