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Twinkie Nutrition Facts

Whether you’re looking for Twinkie nutrition facts or want to know more about your favorite snack, this article is for you! Listed below are some basic Twinkie nutrition facts that you may not know and the ingredients used to make it. In addition to the list of ingredients, these Twinkie nutrition facts are also helpful for determining whether a particular product is healthy or not. By knowing these basic facts, you’ll be able to choose a healthier snack for your next gathering.

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Two cakes of Twinkie have about 260 calories, with only 8 grams of fat, of which 3.5 g are saturated. The other ingredients in Twinkies are sugar, carbohydrates, protein, and none of the vitamins and minerals. The sugar content is also relatively high at 29 g. Sugar can be harmful to your health, and the American Heart Association recommends a limit of six teaspoons for women and nine for men.

Twinkie Nutrition Facts

twinkie nutrition facts

What is Exactly Twinkie?

“Golden sponge cake with a creamy filling” is how an American snack cake is characterized. Hostess Brands used to manufacture and distribute it. Hostess Brands, Inc. (Nasdaq: TWNK) is the brand’s current owner, previously owned by private equity companies Apollo Global Management and C. Dean Metropoulos and Company as the second iteration of Hostess Brands.

Unlike standard burger buns, Twinkies have a lengthy shelf life and are low in fat. They are low in fat but heavy in carbs, and they are frequently deep-fried to create a crispy outer shell. As a result, if you want to be healthy, you can’t consume as much as you like. If you’re seeking Twinkie nutrition information, you should know them before purchasing.

What’s Really in a Twinkie?

Have you ever wondered what’s inside a Twinkie? It’s a wonder it’s even sold as food! Find out why it’s the poster child for Frankenfoods and why we’d never eat a Twinkie in the video below!

  • A single Twinkie contains 37 ingredients, but only 5 of them are ‘recognizable.’ Flour. Egg. Water. Sugar. Salt.
  • Twinkies’ ingredients are manufactured with fourteen of the top twenty chemicals made in the U.S.
  • Chemical concoctions have replaced whole food ingredients. For example, fewer eggs have been used, as monoglycerides and diglycerides have replaced them – chemicals to bind fats and water-based ingredients and extend the product’s shelf.
  • It contains harmful ingredients that contribute significant risk of chronic disease, including high fructose corn syrup (and four other types of sugar!) Yep, there are five types of nasty sugar in a Twinkie!
  • The unhealthiest fats are lurking in there – hydrogenated vegetable fats (trans fats), which are awful for your health!
  • The vitamins, artificial colors, and flavorings come from petroleum.
  • The cream center contains no cream! Instead, it’s full of shortening – a cheap fat.
  • It also contains a small amount of sodium stearate – one of the most common ingredients found in soap! No, thank you!
  • So many of the ingredients come from overseas, including China, where there are hardly any regulations on their use. Scary!

Are Twinkies Healthier than Popular Energy Bars?

Twinkies are a better alternative to some of your favourite snack bars. That is, according to Twinkie! According to the New York Post, Twinkies cleverly compared its nutrition profile to products like Kind Bar and Clif bar. According to the brand, Twinkie has the fewest calories per gram, while Kind has the most. It also has the lowest fat content but the highest sodium content of the bunch.
Friends, paying attention to a nutrition facts panel without looking at the ingredient list is akin to buying a house without seeing the inside. Yes, a Twinkie has fewer calories per gram than the healthier snack options mentioned above. But then what?!
What Eating a Twinkie does to Your Body, According to Science?

Twinkie

The Twinkie is a delectable delight that almost everyone should try at least once in their lives. It’s a well-known American snack cake, and Hostess even refers to the cream-filled golden sponge cake as “The Original Golden Snack that’s been putting smiles on faces for generations.” You’re brought back to a favorite childhood experience of sitting on the couch watching cartoons while eating a Twinkie and drinking milk with just one mouthful.
But what happens if you eat a Twinkie right now? However, you may not understand what this petite cake is doing to your body. We used research to figure out what eating a Twinkie does to your body so you can make an informed decision before stocking up on boxes of these cake bits. Check out these 15 Classic American Desserts That Deserve a Comeback for another nostalgic trip down memory lane.

You Could End Up Consuming Too Much Sugar

Take a peek at a Twinkie’s nutritional breakdown, and you’ll be amazed at how much sugar it contains. Remember that the standard serving size is two cakes, but you’ll still get 29 grams of sugar if you eat one in the morning and one after dinner instead of both at once.
What’s the deal with additional sugar? The American Heart Association recommends that men take 36 grams of added sugar per day and women consume no more than 25 grams. So you’re already going to eat these cakes past the advised limit. There are no nutritional benefits to eating added sugar. Still, excessive intake can lead to obesity and diabetes, and, according to one study, those who consume a high-sugar diet have a higher risk of dying from heart disease.

You Could Gain Weight

Another disadvantage of all that bothersome sugar in Twinkies? It has the potential to make you gain weight. Not only is sugar mentioned as the first ingredient in these snack cakes, but high fructose corn syrup is also included. Mice-fed high-fructose corn syrup acquired much more weight than mice fed table sugar, though both groups consumed the same calories. You won’t be able to get rid of any extra belly fat and will instead gain more.

You’ll Always be Hungry

Another item to note about the nutritional breakdown of the Twinkie is that it has no fiber. Fiber aids digestion and keeps blood sugar levels in check. As a result, you’ll feel fuller for longer. If you eat a low-fiber snack every day, you’ll be hungry again soon. Furthermore, you consume more food, increasing your calorie consumption, and leading to weight gain, especially if you consume more sugary, fiberless snacks.

Your Blood Pressure Can Raise

As previously stated, the amount of added sugar in Twinkies is the main issue. According to a study, sugar may be considerably worse for your blood pressure than salt. According to research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, those who consume 25% or more of their calories from added sugar are more than twice as likely to die of heart disease. Furthermore, a study published in the British Journal of Nutrition indicated that hypertension increased with each sugar-sweetened beverage consumed.

Your Mood Can Change

You may feel better when you first unwrap the Twinkie, but as you consume it, your mood may change. According to one study, eating many processed foods can raise your chances of getting depressed, so it’s safe to assume that all the sugar the Twinkies are packing affects your everyday mood.

Hostess Twinkies Multipack

Hostess Twinkies Multipack, 13.58 Oz, Yellow

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Features:

  • Product Type: Cake
  • Item Package Dimension:6.6 cm L X14.1 cm W X22.6 cm H
  • Item Package Weight:0.427 kg
  • Country Of Origin: United States

Conclusion

Twinkies are a popular and healthy food beneficial in many ways despite their high sugar content.
Twinkies are made with real food, are baked to perfection, and have a shelf life of only 25 days. The Twinkie will continue to exist after this period, but its flavour and texture will significantly deteriorate. Although 25 days is a significantly longer shelf life than most baked goods, this is achieved by avoiding dairy products and using an airtight cellophane wrapper. The vanilla cream filling in Twinkies is made with shortening, sugar, eggs, flavouring, and stabilizers, which spoil slower than natural cream.